No! You're Not Taking My Car! PDF Print E-mail

When you are out in public, what is your level of alertness? Are you the type of person who scans the parking lot? Do you go for a run without a headset and music loudly playing? Do you walk down the street with your head up scanning the people around you? Criminals look for weak and easy targets!

Mr. Keith Rudy, a red belt at our academy, recently demonstrated the importance of being aware of surroundings. While leaving a store and walking to his vehicle, he noticed a man walking towards his vehicle. Mr. Rudy probably surprised the man who might have been looking for an easy theft. Criminals love to find open car doors so they can help themselves to whatever is in the car. This is all speculation – no matter what, the man had bad intentions in mind.

Seeing Mr. Rudy, the man probably had to readjust his plan, so he communicated to Mr. Rudy that he was going to take Mr. Rudy's car. In this type of situation, can you imagine the stress which could easily take over your body and mind? In most cases, victims talk about their complete fixation with the problem. Tunnel vision takes over.

Mr. Rudy did not fall into a state of tunnel vision. He even noticed another vehicle coming in his direction. The man appeared to have a partner.

There are no absolutes in how to defend yourself. Sometimes it's appropriate to run away from danger.

Mr. Rudy's alertness helped him assess the situation. He prepared by taking a fighting stance and communicated very forcefully that no one was going to take his car. In no way did he look like an easy victim. He was not perceived as an easy target. In fact, I'm certain the man considered his own safety as an issue. He ran as fast as he could away from Mr. Rudy.

I appreciate Mr. Rudy allowing us to share his "real world" situation. It was clear that his awareness in the parking lot gave him options. By scanning the parking lot, he was not taken by surprise. He also did not freeze and only see one person. He was able to stay calm and notice that the man on foot had a partner. Finally, he made a decision. He decided to communicate firmly by voice and physical posture that he was not going to be a victim.

Stay alert! Never look like a victim.

Delaware Hapkido Goal: Self-Defense (Use reasonable force when it appears reasonably necessary to prevent an impending injury)

Chad C. Carmack, Ed. D.

 

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